Experience, Longevity Focused on Security

By Ralph C. Jensen | Security Products
Tuesday, March 1, 2016

In November 2015, New York-based system integrator Total Recall Corp. celebrated 30 years of designing and delivering technologically advanced video surveillance security solutions for a variety of industries including law enforcement, government agencies and corporations. Over the years, Total Recall has been called upon to help provide tactical security for some of the most challenging situations such as rebuilding the security system damaged by Hurricane Sandy at the Statue of Liberty and the Concert for Valor that attracted hundreds of thousands of attendees to the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Total Recall has long focused on providing law enforcement with efficient and technologically advanced video surveillance solutions, which is why they developed the CrimeEye line of products. Their exclusive CrimeEye tactical video units enable law enforcement and municipalities to deploy complete video surveillance in a permanent setting. Security Products magazine asked Total Recall founder and president Jordan Heilweil a few questions about his experience in the ever changing environment of video surveillance over the last three decades.

Q. It has been 30 years since you started Total Recall. Were there times that you ever wondered if this was the right career field?

A. I never questioned the path I chose. When I started in this field 30 years ago, the technology was much simpler. I feel like I grew up in the security industry.

Q. What has been the most gratifying installation you have done, and why?

A. I have been very fortunate in my career. I have worked in many very cool places. I’ve been to the tops of very tall bridges as well as their underground anchorage points, under the Lincoln Memorial, and spent many nights at the Statue of Liberty to name just a few. I have a special spot in my heart for the Statue of Liberty. Being able to provide security for a project of such stature and importance has been a career highlight and a real honor for our company.

Q. In your early years, the security industry was low voltage and there probably was not much excitement. The emerging technologies have changed all that. What are the biggest advancements you have seen and participated in?

A. With the explosion of consumer electronics came new affordable technology in the security world. In the early years a black and white camera could cost $500. The drive to digital came from the consumer market. As far as the biggest advancements, the quality of the images we can record and play back, and the ability to route that information to a smartphone halfway around the world is the biggest change I’ve been a part of.

The speed that we go from finding the incident to disseminating the information and taking action is amazing. If you think about it, if the actions of a known terrorist are caught on a surveillance system in the United Kingdom, that information can be streamed to the proper authorities in the United States in just seconds.

In the old days, you went to the location and found the VCR. Pressing play and fast forward, you hoped to find the information and, if lucky, you were able to see one or two frames of information. Then, if you had a high-end solution, you had a video printer so you were able to take a still picture. Then it was back in the car to start taking action. You spent hours or days getting the intel you needed to take action. Now that can happen in minutes without leaving your office.

Q. As you look down the road in your career, can you see more changes coming that will improve security of people, infrastructure and assets?

A. Technology improves everyday. An integrator can hide from new technology or embrace it. We have chosen to always embrace it, validate it, and then figure out what can I do with this technology that we couldn’t do before?

Q. You are proud to be an American. What is your most defining moment of security in the United States?